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The last time I wrote for Earnest & Shallow might have been the last time I really wrote anything at all, aside from college classroom lectures and elementary school press releases. Reading back at the post now, I am struck by its sense of hope. In the face of the murder of Michael Brown, a group of people blinked their eyes and decided on the spot that they weren’t going to let this death be covered over quietly. Their collective voices announced their anger and refused to let anyone talk them out of it. A spontaneous engagement was activated that was exciting because, finally, emotions were being exhaled, and words — which had been barely articulated — were finally being pronounced.

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Those words turned out to be intolerable. The things they were saying and the kind of reality they were exposing was unacceptable. It had to be hidden, no matter how obvious the act of hiding was going to be. Nikole Hannah-Jones’s story for This American Life, “The Problem We All Live With,” investigated the failing public high school from which Michael Brown had recently graduated before being shot in the middle of the street for jaywalking. What Hannah-Jones overhears at a school board meeting when the black students of that school were to be transferred to a neighboring majority-white school is the work of this hiding. Instead of getting angry about, or even acknowledging, the reality of the shitty conditions of public schools in black neighborhoods, the white parents lied to themselves and each other. They said the black students would harm the academic rigor of their school (a lying phrase that really means black students are “inferior”); they worried about the safety of their children (a lying phrase that really means black students are “dangerous”). At the very same time that the truth of Black America was out in powerful numbers at demonstrations, this group of parents was hard at work, hiding. They deformed the message of historical mistreatment, neglect, and abuse that the Ferguson protests vocalized and instead invented the lie of white victimization while insisting on the truth of the American Dream: if they would just work hard enough, maybe they’d get themselves outta the ghetto.

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“The Dream Work” is what Freud called the psyche’s act of transforming the intolerable truth of the Unconscious into a lie pleasing enough for our conscious minds to accept it. In analyzing his “Dream of Irma,” Freud recognizes an unpleasant truth hiding within the content of his dream: he might indeed be guilty of causing his patient’s injury; it might’ve been his fault that she suffered.

Truth has an energy that demands expression: it wells up beneath the surface, warping the veneer with welts that stretch thinner and swell larger the longer we ignore them. But to admit the full force of this energy, to let it spill and cover us over with a new surface, would be more than the conscious, waking self is willing to bear. In order to protect the ego’s fragile brittle façade, the “dream work” offers its assistance. The psyche’s process of condensation and displacement rearranges the elements of truth so that a status quo is maintained. The Unconscious nonetheless speaks through the dream, but it is in an unrecognizable form and with a muted voice.

What Freud’s dream ends up showing him is not the possibility of his guilt but quite the opposite. Irma (whom, in waking life, he might have harmed) appears in his dream as a “recalcitrant” woman, resistant to the obvious soundness of his treatment. He must force this frigid woman’s mouth open (an act his analysis suspects might be invasive) in order to properly inspect the source of the trouble, which turns out — in his dream — to be an infection not caused by himself, but by the incompetence of others. Played out before his sleeping eyes, the dream allows Freud to hit reset and repel the energy of difficult, awkward, uncomfortable possibilities, to hide it and tell a different story: the glory of his success and the frustration with others for not being as good.

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Almost 3 million more people voted for HRC. Numbers reveal the desire of the majority.

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The electoral college establishes a foggy vision of representative democracy. An ancient law emerges, one that had protected slave-owning interests, to mute — rearrange and hide — the force of possibilities.

from http://metrocosm.com/election-2016-map-3d/

from http://metrocosm.com/election-2016-map-3d/